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139Signal27

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139Signal27 last won the day on February 3 2019

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About 139Signal27

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  1. I think it’d be cool if the setting of Backlot was changed to Cincinnati. The road signs and such could be adjusted to reflect local places.
  2. Six Flags America is the interesting one. It’s notorious for being an awful park. The coaster lineup is weak, rides are constantly closed for maintenance, the staff is rude, and the park just isn’t very nice. From the outside, it seems like it would take a massive investment to bring that park up to Cedar Fair standards. There’s also the issue of its location. The mid-Atlantic region has so many regional parks that competition is crazy. If Cedar Fair owned America, every addition would risk self-cannibalizing Kings Dominion and possibly Dorney Park. It’s also rumored that the land on which the park sits could be sold for a higher price to developers than the park is actually worth. That park faces a lot of headwinds for any potential buyer, especially Cedar Fair. As unfortunate as it sounds, relocating any worthwhile assets, demolishing the remaining structures, and selling the land might be the most strategic move if Cedar Fair somehow acquired the park.
  3. I’ve actually been thinking about this recently. With the current economic climate and Six Flags’ existing financial troubles, I think it’s very possible Six Flags could sell a few parks in the next five years. They actually don’t own all their parks — some they lease from EPR Properties, some they lease from local governments, and some they own through partnership agreements. The following are the parks they own outright, so I assume the only parks they could potentially sell: Magic Mountain Great America Great Adventure Fiesta Texas New England Discovery Kingdom St. Louis America Great Escape I don’t think Six Flags would be interested in selling the top four, but I think everything from New England down could be on the table, for the right price. As far as Cedar Fair goes, they have competing parks in the same markets as Discovery Kingdom and America, so I don’t see any interest there (unless they want to pull a Geauga Lake — gut and close. The land under America is supposedly more valuable than the park itself, so it’s not necessarily out of the question). That leaves New England, St. Louis, and Great Escape. I honestly think Great Escape would be a good buy for Cedar Fair. The lodge and indoor water park would be a nice source of year-round revenue for the company, and the park itself has room to grow. New England and St. Louis would also make solid additions to the middle tier of Cedar Fair parks, and would give the company access to new markets. Under Cedar Fair ownership, I think you would see a few things — the removal of outdated rides and attractions, general park improvements to meet Cedar Fair standards, a larger focus on family attractions and non-ride experiences, and improved in-park guest services. As far as theming, I think Cedar Fair has learned its lesson from the Paramount Parks. I think we would see the DC and Six Flags IPs replaced with more unique, local themes. Recent investor presentations have talked about creating authentic local charm at the parks, so I think we would see that approach at any new parks the company would acquire.
  4. I surely hope so! It seems that KI wants Area 72 to be a truly themed land, not just a loose collection of attractions. It would be cool if actors walked around the area to really sell the theme.
  5. The water park’s main purpose is to drive season pass sales and repeat visitation from passholders. The hope is people choose a Gold Pass over a membership to their local pool. The park can then generate revenue through food & beverage sales, locker rentals, cabana rentals, etc. To most everyone, a wave pool is a wave pool and a water slide is a water slide, so major capital investments simply aren’t needed as regularly. Guests are going to care more about things like changing room cleanliness, food stand lines, pool chair capacity, etc. than an objectively outdated slide complex. The biggest quality of life improvement I think the water park could make would be to plant more trees! It’s like a barren parking lot over there right now.
  6. Remember, the renderings were only concepts. As with any creative project, the final design will be different than the original concept.
  7. It’s a term referring to full-time associates. Their name tags are gold instead of white.
  8. You’re putting a lot of effort into this.
  9. There’s no way you can know that absolutely no parts were sent to KI in 2003. Why would Chad make that up? Sure, some parts were kept in Canada, but to say that absolutely no parts were sent to KI in 2003 is silly.
  10. I’m going to believe the official blog over a fansite every time.
  11. I’m genuinely impressed with that blog post! That was an extremely interesting and thorough read. Keep more coming!
  12. I don’t think the footings mean anything — they are probably already gone. If not, they probably will be once crews get back to work, or the park decided it wasn’t worth spending the money to remove them right now. I certainly don’t think this is the beginning of some great teaser campaign.
  13. I haven’t been following this thread, so I apologize if this has already been discussed. Do you think the park will overhaul Urgent Scare to avoid the unfavorable connection it would have with the pandemic? Regardless of the facts, some will assume the park is making light of the situation. I wouldn’t be opposed (not because I am offended, but because I think it’s time for that maze to go). Thoughts?
  14. The ride has been brown, and the cream is new. The question is whether it’s a primer or the final coat.
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