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Buckeye Brad

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Everything posted by Buckeye Brad

  1. I’d love something similar to frozen Butterbeer at Universal. Or really, any frozen non-dairy slush type beverage. I’ve found that when it’s hot, cold treats with dairy don’t get along with my stomach. But frozen Butterbeer and similar, I can do all day long. I miss the Stawberry and Pineapple Congo Coolers they used to sell back by the Screamin Demon. if there is something similar today, please let me know as I’m not as familiar with the current offerings.
  2. There appears to be plenty of room in front and left of the front gate for some coaster track. This would be more like Leviathan at CW than GateKeeper CP. In my opinion this is a better option because it retains the feel of the existing entrance plaza, but still creates a fun dynamic of bringing a coaster “outside” of the park. When I visited CW, the “parking lot” elements of Leviathan did create a fun effect.
  3. We arrived very early this morning and just left the late night portion. A fantastic day as always, albeit very crowded. No additional information shared about the tragic fatality beyond the park’s statement and local news coverage. It’s always very sobering when a fatality (or even serious injury) occurs at an amusement park, regardless of cause. I just rode Raven in the back seat a few hours ago. EVERY time I ride and get to that 5th drop, I think about the 2003 fatality. It’s sobering and terrifying. Be smart, and be a protector to your loved ones.
  4. I believe 98% of the hate is the result of the head banging, uncomfortable hard seats, and (in my opinion) a claustrophobic feeling in the trains. I loved it though. Regarding the comparisons to Cedar Point Corkscrew and BG Loch Ness Monster…Vortex was built at a very high elevation compared to those two. Except for the final elements, everything was very high off the ground, which required more steel supports, which were more expensive to maintain. That height made Vortex all the more impressive visually, but I believe contributed to its shorter life.
  5. I scored 2 rides on Friday night…front seat and second from back. In my opinion, these rides were slightly better than my 3 rides last year. Can’t put my finger on any one aspect that was significantly different, just felt solid all the way through. Also, the trim brake did not feel as strong. The first drop is still magnificent. :^)
  6. I was fortunate enough to take a ride on Racer tonight at the friends and family event. Blue side, second seat. Best Racer ride for me in years. The new outbound stretch was whipped cream smooth and the entire ride was great. Great job to KI and GG for all the TLC on Racer. I’d still love a backwords ride, but short of that, I’m thankful that Racer is running fantastic again.
  7. One area of confusion/disagreement is that of TIME of close contact to be considered exposure. Last year I remember hearing about “close contact” with a COVID positive person being 15 consecutive minutes, then 15 cumulative minutes in a 24 hour period. I’ve not heard much mention about that since. And I was never clear if those minutes applied to outside (presumably more than 15 minutes). Interestingly, yesterday I saw this quote from Cedar Point: “In addition to continued guidance from health professionals, none of our rides are long enough to meet the criteria that’s been established by the CDC as consistent exposure,” -Tony Clark So while I still am personally not 100% clear on the current CDC guidance, we can infer Cedar Fair’s understanding of what duration of outdoor exposure is safe. That said, their policies do vary by state (see Kings Dominion) and certainly by country (see Canada’s Wonderland). There is quite a spectrum in policy among amusement parks, and now sports teams (Braves and LSU). I’m looking forward to enjoying this season at KI, masks or not. :^)
  8. Disclaimer: I’ve never believed that this incident was true in any form. I posted the article to make the point how easy it is for these stories to spread, even in the mainstream news. Just making that clear as this thread develops.
  9. One would think that Kings Island PR would have demanded an immediate correction. Maybe someone with access to USA Today back issues (microfilm at a library perhaps) could look at issues from the following days and see. I’ve seen so many errors in coaster articles and TV news over the years that have always made me cautious about believing everything I see.
  10. Re-reading this article, there are all kinds of errors and exaggerations: -Beast being a “white” coaster -Ninja being the latest coaster “twist”(8 years after the first suspended coaster) -Racer being the USA’s only dual tracked coaster (Colossus is even mentioned later in the article, not to mention Rebel Yell, Gemini, etc) -100 million riders on Arrow coasters in 1987? That sounds off by a few... On the other hand, the Louisville Sporting goods guy they interviewed sounds legit. We should track him down and get the real story :^)
  11. I did when I was a kid. My dad would save them for me too. In the pre-internet days we had to be creative and observant. :^) It’s not a big collection, maybe 20 or so articles and brochures I stuffed in a tote between other newspapers about the Reds and Bengals championships.
  12. On a hunch I dug though some old papers and found it. USA Today, 1988 The pictures are out of order but the entire article is there. The section in question is highlighted.
  13. I have a memory of reading a newspaper article (in the late ‘80s) on coasters or coaster safety that made a passing mention to this Beast decapitation story. It might have been worded something like “a man died on The Beast when he stood up and hit a tunnel “. My memory of the exact words is admittedly fuzzy, but I do remember that I was surprised and suspicious. I’d never heard of this incident before, and could not confirm it (with the sources available to a teen in the late ‘80). Given how closely Kings Island has always been covered by local media, I can’t imagine any incident of major public interest (like a ride-caused fatality) going unnoticed. In any case, sometimes these false “stories” are spread by legitimate news sources. Perhaps an honest mistake, or something else. My guess is that this all originated with some guys getting off the ride and commenting on what would happen “if” someone stood up. We ALL thought it because the speed combined with all those tunnels certainly captures the imagination. Because of that potential image, I didn’t need the lap bar or any restraints to convince me to “Sit on it”. :^)
  14. It was back near where the new antique cars are now, just across from where The Vortex queue once stood. It did have a somewhat bubble shape like the inflatable theater you are thinking. I remember it was much smaller and more like a yurt or steel framed tent.
  15. I loved watching these. I believe the park called it the “Cinema 180”. A new one every year. I remember each one stating with a coaster POV, then a random collection of other POVs like a race car, airplane, and even a runaway baby carriage through a hilly downtown. The floor was uncomfortable, and we got quite dizzy, but it was always a nice break. I looked a while back on YouTube and was not successful.
  16. I remember watching the coverage of the announcement that day and following the coaster forums that were around then. Overall, most fans were absolutely thrilled at the size, scope, and theme. It seemed like a perfect “Kings Island” addition, and one that would dominate the park for the next few decades. I do remember a few comments and concerns about the manufacturer, and about the long term maintenance of a wooden coaster that large. I saw their point, but figured that KI’s maintenance would work out any bugs eventually. As for myself, I was pretty pumped, but a little underwhelmed by the post loop layout. I rode SOB and Holiday World’s brand new Legend a few weeks apart, and realized that (in my opinion) Legend was better in almost every way. Here is my small piece of Son of Beast, on my desk at work to remind me to dream big, but to be humble as well.
  17. 4. Why were no tent camping sites added into the campground? Answer: The campground was not designed to offer tent or primitive style camping, but guests without an RV may stay in a cottage. This is an interesting non-specific answer. My guess is that there are 2 reasons: 1. Tent camping requires a decent amount of space + restrooms and showers, and the return on investment to maintain those is not that great considering the lower price point of tent stays. 2. Tent camping can bring in more noise and drama that don't mix well with the resort environment they are going for. I've tent and hammock camped all over the US, and am disappointed that camp Cedar won't have tent sites, but I understand the decision. There are nice tent camping options just up the river. Repeating that these reasons are simply my guesses. There may be others, including county health codes hurdles and such. My church opened a huge primitive private campground east of Cincy a few years ago, and deals with lots of county health restrictions that I would not have thought of. I love the idea of tenting in the woods between the river and The Beast. Here comes your 6AM wake up call!
  18. My humble vote goes to The Beast. I am a big fan of The Racer. Without it, The Beast would not likely exist, and I would love to see The Racer restored to its red, white, blue, smooth, racing, and backwards glory. The Racer absolutely helped the public fall in love with wooden coasters again. It was "just" a bigger version of what riders were familiar with (Shooting Star). But The Beast defined how a coaster could be huge, "epic", and have a personality. A story. An immersive experience before, during, and after. Much of this is due to the hidden setting that had to be ridden to be known, and even the logo. Just look at this logo. It looks like a poster for a great horror movie. Riding The Beast, especially at night, was like experiencing that movie. We are so lucky to have both Beast and Racer in one park!
  19. Coaster lines are long. Currently in a (supposedly) 50 min line for Mystic Timbers. According to the app, Orion is 90 min, Beast 60. My plan of many night rides is foiled. Thankful to be at KI with my family though. White Water Canyon was a sweet walk-on, with great views of Mystic.
  20. I am curious about B&M giga coaster chain lifts. My limited coaster understanding In the 90s was that coaster chain lifts above 200’ were heavy and reaching the practical limit. This appeared to be confirmed in 2000 when Steel Dragon utilized dual chains, and Millennium Force introduced a cable lift. Flash forward to 2012, and Leviathan breaks 300’ with what appears to be a traditional chain lift. Not only that, it’s quite fast, and there’s no return trough hanging below... it’s enclosed in the beefy track. This has obviously been successful with Fury and now Orion. So my question is, what’s special about B&M giga chain lifts? How did they seemingly so simply solve this problem that other engineers did not?
  21. I ride KC a lot from 1985-1991 as a teen. My experiences were almost always smooth. It had a bit of an edge to it because the tall restraints felt a bit shaky, but I never had discomfort or even head banging. I also learned how to adjust the restraints quickly while boarding: equal clearance above the shoulders and below the crotch. This provided airtime up top, and protection down below. Carefully looking at the layout photos of KC, you may notice that it has a certain elegance, and smoother transitions between elements, that Vortex for example did not. This elegance helped provide a smoother ride in my opinion. The loading was always slow. Two train stacking was the norm due to lots of customized adjustments by the operators to most every seat. Even short lines took longer than expected. One unique feature was the abrupt final brake run. I learned to relax my body right before, providing a weird forward air time. Another unique feature was a station flyby just after the helix. After exiting the train, you could stand periously close to the next train speeding out of the helix, close enough to see the contorted faces of the riders. Another memory is the forced exit though the Safari themed gift shop. One of the fancier KI shops. In my final analysis, KC was a fun, consistent ride, always worth a <25 minute wait. It was a great compliment to Vortex, and had great theming, especially in the early years. I rode Skyrider in 2014, and sadly it was painful and did not match my memories of King Cobra.
  22. I also rode X2, on my first ever visit to SFMM this past summer. My thoughts... 1. It looks awesome and intimidating 2. In theory it’s fantastic ride... the rotation was a gimmick, but a really cool gimmick. 3. My first ride was rough but unique and enjoyable. My second was downright brutal. I was being shaken like crazy, and begging for it to be over. Both rides were in the same seat (front, right, outboard) but perhaps different trains. I consider my coaster pain tolerance to be above average (happily endured 3 Vortex rides in half an hour last October). But this second X2 ride was a dealbreaker for me. 4. I think there are only 2 of these because it just appears ridiculously complex and expensive, and because it's just too extreme for most of the general public. I think that beyond the hardcore coaster fans, the GP would much prefer to ride a B&M wing coaster, which looks "close enough" to this with a much more comfortable riding experience. I'm glad Arrow and Six took a risk and tried something new... But in the end I can see why other parks go a safer route. I doubt KI will install anything more "extreme" than Banshee in the foreseeable future. If Orion is anything like my rides on Leviathan, it will be a magic carpet, smooth, fast delight that will appeal to far more riders than a 4D coaster.
  23. My son and I went last year. Highlights: 1. As mentioned, the freedom to roam an empty park. The cool weirdness of seeing the park in "winter mode" (no flowers or landscaping, many rides disassembled) 2. Getting up close and personal with the Intamin coaster trains. Millennium force and Dragster trains were on the midways near their stations, separated into cars and up on risers. Very nerdy, but I actually laid down on the cold pavement to look underneath at the mechanics of the wheels and axles. It's cool how complex and heavy duty everything is. 3. The separate trip to the Amazement Shop” on the mainland. More up close and personal encounters with most every coaster train, many stripped down to the frame. Also enjoyed the newly painted Corkscrew cars and the huge paint booth. 4. The hotel laundry room. Those machines are big. Really big. 5. The overall VIP feeling. It was cold so they passed out hats. Plenty of hot chocolate. Every employee we encountered was enthusiastic and eager to share and answer our questions. It’s a 4 hour drive, and therefore maybe a once or twice a decade activity for us. But we’re very glad we went.
  24. Fishleehooker, I believe Diamonbacks supports are "different" because there are buildings and pathways where the typical "triangle" supports would bottom out. The splashdown zone might affect the support placement too.Looks like the B&M engineers used lots of ingenuity to fit Diamondback's first hill over that busy part of Rivertown. Orion (and most every other B&M Giga and Hyper I've seen) is built over more of a clean slate type of land.
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