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Six Flags Changes Its Line Policy For Disabled Patrons


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One of my friends had a bad foot and was force to ride in a wheelchair all day at Cedar Point and trust me its not very much fun. This is a great policy how they make you wait your turn. I really don't mind waiting in lines but it is kind of hard to do so when your in a wheel chair and this policy I think really is the best thing to do.

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Seems like a good decision on Six Flags part. Everyone should be treated equal, whether they have a disability or not, and this policy is the best way to do that. Everyone will still be able to ride, and it helps to cut down on blatant abuse of the system. It is unbelievable how much abuse the old policy faced, and how many people tired to get on through the exit.

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Seems like a good decision on Six Flags part. Everyone should be treated equal, whether they have a disability or not, and this policy is the best way to do that. Everyone will still be able to ride, and it helps to cut down on blatant abuse of the system. It is unbelievable how much abuse the old policy faced, and how many people tired to get on through the exit.

Please fill us in on how much of a problem and issue this was.

I've been to many, many, many parks and have never seen that it was even the remotest of issues.

Now in turn, I've seen quite a bit of folk complain quite a bit about the fast pass system.

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(User treads lightly into this topic as it is usually a hotbed for sore feelings)

I think the problem here is that our parks are being overtaken by, how do I say this in the nicest possible way, being overrun by those with little to no respect for the rules or how people are supposed to act in a civilized society.

To stay on topic, what we have here is a perk that for a long time had become an industry standard, that of allowing, what the current "Comittee on Acceptable Epusieums", call "Special Needs Guests" courtesy priority access to the attractions. True, these policies probably started due to the simple fact that ride queue areas were not disigned to accomoate wheelchairs, and rahter than come up with some Rube Goldberg-ish rservation program, the parks decided to quietly admit those needing spcial acces to the ride to enter via the exit, and without waiting. I'm sure the underlying thought was a) its the right thing to do to show compassion for our fellow man, and B) this allows the person the additional time needed, and c) the number of people who will avail themselves of the perk will be so small, that it won't casue a stir in the operation for the ride.

Unfortunately, there also exists an aleged group of people, who have figured out how to bend the par's hospitality to their own advantage. Which is a shame really, because now to eliminate the abuse, they have to "throw the baby out with the bath water" and eliminate the perk entirely, even to those for whom it was intended.

I recall that for a long time, a standing policy at Dollywood was that if you were "Special Needs" you did not pay admission to park. Your admission was courtesy of Dolly Parton as a gesture of good will. Unfortunately, for that program, someone complained about it to the wrong person, and Dolly's lawyers advised her to discontinue that perk. Excuse me, if I am the owner of the park, I think I am entitled to grant courtesies and complimentaries as I see fit.

But the whole "feigning disability" for the sake of skipping to the front of a lie comes from a phenomenon I call "Generation: Now" As in "I want it all, and I want it NOW!" (and to heck with what anybody else) We see how well that worked out for Veruca Salt in the classic alegory set in a certain chocolate factory.

In the end, now we have to manage the park rules to the worst of people, instead of to the best of people.

That said, Kings Island is the only place I have seen guests get openly hostile against those who do opt to use the special needs entrances.

Once was this year on Son of Beast, I witnessed a confrontation between a loader and a park guest. The loader came over to graciously explain the situation to those guests who would be impacted in order to allow a special needs guest to enter via the exit. Well, to say the least the park guests impacted did not take the news well, and became very confrontational and loud, causing a very awkward chill to fall over the Son of Beast platform. The loader decided he would better off seating the party in a different car, and the obnoxious park guest would not let it drop, practically celebrating in their victory. I would like to say that the obnoxious park guest was one of the punk teenagers who are all too common at the park these days, but unfortunately it wasn't. It was a father with his children. I sk you what kind of an example do you really want to set for your kids. "Kids, we are the most important people in the world, everybody else here is below us, we don't bend for anybody, even iif the people who think they are in charge here ask us to. Remember that, Your in this family, which means you yield to nobody"

The other incident was a few years ago on Vortex, when there was, a much less heated than the confrontation described above, argument caused over the park giving a disabled rider two rides instead of one. (Which is, IIRC the park polciy, 1 ride in a front or back car, or 2 anywhere else)

Whatever happened to courtesy, a representative of the park asks you nicely to wait just an extra 3 minutes so that someone who needs extra time and attention can ride. It used to be uspoken that of course you yielded.

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The new policy mentions that guests should get a flash pass reservation. Does that mean they have to purchase a flash pass for the day? If so it just sounds like a way to make more money. I'm hoping they waive the flash pass fee for people with disabilities.

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That's the same reason KI started to do that as well.

When did Kings Island start doing this? On my last visit I saw someone get on right away and they did not look like they need a wheel chair at all. Sorry but if I come off a ride and see you walking down the mid way I don't think you should be using the special needs line.

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^^Mental disabilities; and if the wait is under 30 minutes they let you right on, I have a brother who is very autistic and KI policy.... well it does us wounders at the park.

You selfish people!

Why can't ya just wait like everyone else!

<G>

Certainly I am kidding, but thank you for providing a perfect example of why a wait policy is not always the best course of action.

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