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New attraction at Knott's Berry Farm?


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From the desk of one Screamscape.com...

icon_STOP.gif2013 - Giga Coaster - Rumor - (8/15/12) Knott’s new 2013 coaster looks like it should be moving full steam ahead at last. The rumors all point to a Giga sized coaster, possibly in the range of 325-340 feet tall. Intamin is still the rumored designer, though I have heard B&M’s name dropped as well a couple of times. All those wild survey markers seen around the park about 18 months ago may all come into play once again, with a crazy ride layout that could very well run wild over a large portion of the park.
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With one $30 million investment already on the books I doubt we will see another $20 million plus ride for 2013 (yes, yes I realize that this did in fact happen with both Intimidators going in the same year). That would leave very very little to go around for the rest of the parks for next year. I think we may see the boomerang come out at the end of next summer and this turn out to be a 2014-2015 project.

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I see it as this that Cedar Point got a coaster cause it probably wasnt that expensive to remove disaster transport ( don't yell at me if im wrong this is just my guess) so they money for a new coaster. Kingsisland has to tear down the son of The Beast so that is going to be expensive so i dont see a new coaster there until 2014 or 2015 but for knotts berry farm with perilous plunge idk how much that would cost to remove but if they didnt have planning done then I just dont see a coaster for next year maybe again in 2014 and 2015 but with all this cost I find the parks equal with new coasters and other events happening.

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Just guesstimates here but I'd imagine Cedar Fair capital expenditures will be between $80-$90 million.

Cedar Point $30m for Gatekeeper (which likely includes cost of demo, and the rest of the story)

Great America $15m for "Au13" I know that's high for a woody but it's California and due to earthquakes regulations it'll likely cost more than usual

That would leave $30-$45m for the rest of the chain.

Again completely guessing here but I'd imagine the rest will work out something like this.

Kings Dominion $10m for kids area refurbishment/expansion

Worlds of Fun $5m for a WindSeeker

Carowinds $5m for Dinos and or Luminosity style show

This is where it gets tricky, roughly $10m-$25m left on the table. Which they could give Knotts a $25m coaster while shafting everyone else. Or split up the remaining $10m-$25m among everyone everyone else. Personally I feel it would be more likely for the $25m to be given to Knotts while everyone else gets the shaft or at most minimal (respectively) investments.

Again just guessing here I'm no intern and have no relations with the dippin dots guy.

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Sharing some thoughts on capital expenditures based upon my own experience outside the amusement park industry:

- First a reminder that the Government (IRS, SEC, and other agencies) has rules that define how businesses must mange money: for example, what is a capital expenditure versus what is expense spending (capital creates a depreciating asset) and when spending must be reported

- If, as I beleive to be the case, the FUN financial/tax year is Jan-Dec, a new coaster project like Gatekeeper will have major spending in both 2012 (design costs, Purchase of parts delivered this year, demo) and 2013 (installation, parts delivered next year). Therefore, you can't just assign the $30Million project cost to a fiscal year spend easily. The corporation must mange both yearly costs and project costs.

- I'd also expect FUN to build their capital budgets up from zero each year, beginning with an annual budget for capital repairs and improvements (planned and unexpected) at each park. For example, fixing Delirium this year was likely an unexpected capital outlay (Im guessing that cost of parts made them capital per IRS regulations). Fixing siding on FOF building may also fit this category.

- After this, I'd imagine that the major projects capital budget is an iterative process between the parks and corporate where projects, costs, return on investment, and link to park master plans are all factors in which projects move forward in a given year (you know there are more requests than money available).

- How well the company is doing is also important in the equation as capital spend is a cash flow so as the year progresses, there may be tightening or easing of the purse strings.

And if CF is like other companies, I'd bet there is a ton of back room politics and negotiations when it comes down to who gets the money - with each park feeling that they deserve more than they get :)

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Just guesstimates here but I'd imagine Cedar Fair capital expenditures will be between $80-$90 million.

Cedar Point $30m for Gatekeeper (which likely includes cost of demo, and the rest of the story)

Great America $15m for "Au13" I know that's high for a woody but it's California and due to earthquakes regulations it'll likely cost more than usual

That would leave $30-$45m for the rest of the chain.

Again completely guessing here but I'd imagine the rest will work out something like this.

Kings Dominion $10m for kids area refurbishment/expansion

Worlds of Fun $5m for a WindSeeker

Carowinds $5m for Dinos and or Luminosity style show

This is where it gets tricky, roughly $10m-$25m left on the table. Which they could give Knotts a $25m coaster while shafting everyone else. Or split up the remaining $10m-$25m among everyone everyone else. Personally I feel it would be more likely for the $25m to be given to Knotts while everyone else gets the shaft or at most minimal (respectively) investments.

Again just guessing here I'm no intern and have no relations with the dippin dots guy.

One thing to consider is the cost of removing SoB for KI. This will be a BIG cost consideration.

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Sharing some thoughts on capital expenditures based upon my own experience outside the amusement park industry:

- First a reminder that the Government (IRS, SEC, and other agencies) has rules that define how businesses must mange money: for example, what is a capital expenditure versus what is expense spending (capital creates a depreciating asset) and when spending must be reported

- If, as I beleive to be the case, the FUN financial/tax year is Jan-Dec, a new coaster project like Gatekeeper will have major spending in both 2012 (design costs, Purchase of parts delivered this year, demo) and 2013 (installation, parts delivered next year). Therefore, you can't just assign the $30Million project cost to a fiscal year spend easily. The corporation must mange both yearly costs and project costs.

- I'd also expect FUN to build their capital budgets up from zero each year, beginning with an annual budget for capital repairs and improvements (planned and unexpected) at each park. For example, fixing Delirium this year was likely an unexpected capital outlay (Im guessing that cost of parts made them capital per IRS regulations). Fixing siding on FOF building may also fit this category.

- After this, I'd imagine that the major projects capital budget is an iterative process between the parks and corporate where projects, costs, return on investment, and link to park master plans are all factors in which projects move forward in a given year (you know there are more requests than money available).

- How well the company is doing is also important in the equation as capital spend is a cash flow so as the year progresses, there may be tightening or easing of the purse strings.

And if CF is like other companies, I'd bet there is a ton of back room politics and negotiations when it comes down to who gets the money - with each park feeling that they deserve more than they get :)

FIxing Delirium seems like a yearly thing so it probaly was in the budget. AHAHAHAHHA!

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Knott's has decided to dismantle the ride and redevelop the location. A Knott's official declined to describe the nature of the redevelopment, only saying plans will be revealed shortly. The park announced the closure of the Plunge in August, inviting guests for one last freefall on Labor Day.

http://www.ocregister.com/news/ride-370291-plunge-knott.html

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