Jump to content
sikkinixx99

Adventure Express is getting new chain

Recommended Posts

Do coaster lift chains have a set lifetime that they have to be replaced after, or are they generally only replaced when there are signs of unusual wear or damage?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ More than likely, they have a set lifetime. I would imagine metal fatigue is a pretty common issue with them. It's probably been replaced at least once before now; Don just decided to tweet about it.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some rides were replaced at interval, but it was a big interval. Like my ride got it's chain if I remember almost 10 years or so before.

Most of the time though they get replaced if maint. sees a reason to change it, or something happens (see Iron Dragon)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the longest time, a couple seasons ago, that first lift hill used to make a loud popping sound and jerk the train as the train was catching the chain to be pulled up the lift hill. It used to scare the crap out of me. I didn't notice it as bad last season though. I thought maybe it had been fixed. I have no idea what was causing it. Does anyone else know what I'm talking about?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah..I always related it to the chain tensioner. There's an air..for lack of better words, the term escapes me at the moment, balloon, bladdar, etc. Is filled and attached on the return loop. On AE it really drops and shakes a bit keeping tension on the chain. Thats at least what I figured it was. That and combined with the train not matching the chain jog speed, is what I guess makes a nice jolt. Just my thoughts, other people may chime in a bit better.

Quick Edit: Talking about this section, edit again, wrong shot

307615_2473666449566_590739043_n.jpg

To me though I kinda like that jolt, being a mine train ride it kinda..fits you know

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the longest time, a couple seasons ago, that first lift hill used to make a loud popping sound and jerk the train as the train was catching the chain to be pulled up the lift hill. It used to scare the crap out of me. I didn't notice it as bad last season though. I thought maybe it had been fixed. I have no idea what was causing it. Does anyone else know what I'm talking about?

I remember it doing that back in '06 (which was the last time I went to the KI before this past year's Haunt), so I assume it was a problem for a while.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are disturbing the forbidden temple...

NOW THEY WILL PAY!

eh- you just assuage them by tiki-dancing in your seat. works every time.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So what do you think they do with the old chains? Recycle? Refurbish? Paper weight?

I have always wanted a chain link or a wheel that's out of commission for my amusement park memorabilia collection.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So what do you think they do with the old chains? Recycle? Refurbish? Paper weight?

I have always wanted a chain link or a wheel that's out of commission for my amusement park memorabilia collection.

I would also like a link from this ride. However, more than anything else, I would love to locate the original commercial advertisement for AE. I remember it showcasing the ride as a terrifying new attraction :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank God this is getting it I sort of hope its the first lift hill because that lift jerks you when you first start going up it and then your stuck with the back forward back forward feeling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to work on car washes. This looks like D-88K chain, most tunnel washes use it. The biggest problem is the holes in the links are elongated from wear caused by the pins. Or vice versa. After the tensioners are at their limit, a few links are removed and this goes on until wear causes complete failure. Sometimes you can just change the pins, if you want to be cheap.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure this came from S&S since they still make the replacement parts for Arrow Coasters!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ More than likely, they have a set lifetime. I would imagine metal fatigue is a pretty common issue with them. It's probably been replaced at least once before now; Don just decided to tweet about it.

Someone didnt read the expiration date on the chain for The Vortex in 2011!

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to work on car washes. This looks like D-88K chain, most tunnel washes use it. The biggest problem is the holes in the links are elongated from wear caused by the pins. Or vice versa. After the tensioners are at their limit, a few links are removed and this goes on until wear causes complete failure. Sometimes you can just change the pins, if you want to be cheap.

I can semi-vouch for this since I do some design work with industrial chains. I haven't done very much with it personally, so I don't know exactly what kind it is by sight, but D88K sounds like it could be about right.

Which, of course, means that Adventure Express' chains aren't necessarily from S&S. And that doesn't mean the chain is any less quality, either. Nor does it mean that the chain is any better quality. I actually would doubt that S&S manufactures their own chains personally, though I don't know that for a fact. Chain design and manufacturing are their own industry.

Also, that's actually very intriguing about the pins... The uses I've seen for these types of chains wouldn't allow removal of the links, so it's very interesting to me to hear how the service lives are extended like that. Wouldn't it be cheaper to remove the links like you mentioned than changing the pins out, though?

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to work on car washes. This looks like D-88K chain, most tunnel washes use it. The biggest problem is the holes in the links are elongated from wear caused by the pins. Or vice versa. After the tensioners are at their limit, a few links are removed and this goes on until wear causes complete failure. Sometimes you can just change the pins, if you want to be cheap.

I can semi-vouch for this since I do some design work with industrial chains. I haven't done very much with it personally, so I don't know exactly what kind it is by sight, but D88K sounds like it could be about right.

Which, of course, means that Adventure Express' chains aren't necessarily from S&S. And that doesn't mean the chain is any less quality, either. Nor does it mean that the chain is any better quality. I actually would doubt that S&S manufactures their own chains personally, though I don't know that for a fact. Chain design and manufacturing are their own industry.

Also, that's actually very intriguing about the pins... The uses I've seen for these types of chains wouldn't allow removal of the links, so it's very interesting to me to hear how the service lives are extended like that. Wouldn't it be cheaper to remove the links like you mentioned than changing the pins out, though?

I would fathom to guess that you're right. Customized stuff comes from the manufacturer. Stuff like chains, nuts, bolts, paint, etc probably comes from a supply house. Plus it probably takes specific equipment to make chains, so it would make more sense for the manufacturer to order the chains in the first place.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Genuine GM parts come from many suppliers worldwide. GM cannot require use of its own parts in order to maintain warranty unless it provides those parts free of charge. It can, however, specify the requirements for aftermarket parts in order for those parts to comply as replacement parts. Fake replacement parts, usually cheap Chinese knock-offs, are a real problem in the automotive industry.

I'd suspect that chain manufacturing and sales in the amusement industry are similar to the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM)\Aftermarket automotive paradigm.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...