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Cedar Fair pickers scour Europe for vintage amusement park rides

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I have many fond memories of Lagoon's Enterprise, so that would be my personal vote of a ride to make a return to KI.

Also seems to be a ride that is featured at many other CF parks, which I think increases the likelihood. But who knows.

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I'd like Conneaut to be able to live on it's own, however I think that time is sadly gone. Too little too late I fear, and that's what hurts the most.

It would be. I'm suggesting paying that for the RIDE. (The excess over fair market value may be considered a tax deduction--Cedar Fair would need to consult its tax advisors. Remember, the park is owned by a charitable trust.)

The amount could pay off the creditors and the park could get a fresh start.

And quit skimming posts (you missed that the carousel mechanic is working gratis, too.)

As long as the market value of the ride is below a certain percentage then the entire "gift" to the charitable organization would be tax deductible. Otherwise only part would be deductible. Much like donation requirements to purchase seats at college athletics are usually about 80% deductible.

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There might be an Enterprise available down in Louisville next year (depending on who actually owns the rides)...

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I'd like Conneaut to be able to live on it's own, however I think that time is sadly gone. Too little too late I fear, and that's what hurts the most.

It would be. I'm suggesting paying that for the RIDE. (The excess over fair market value may be considered a tax deduction--Cedar Fair would need to consult its tax advisors. Remember, the park is owned by a charitable trust.)

The amount could pay off the creditors and the park could get a fresh start.

And quit skimming posts (you missed that the carousel mechanic is working gratis, too.)

As long as the market value of the ride is below a certain percentage then the entire "gift" to the charitable organization would be tax deductible. Otherwise only part would be deductible. Much like donation requirements to purchase seats at college athletics are usually about 80% deductible.

Actually, your example proves its the opposite.

The portion above the fair market value is the contribution--in your example, 80 percent. Even when an item given the donor has only minimal value, its fair market value is still deducted from the amount given the donee. See pledge gifts from public broadcasting--just like your collegiate athletic seats.

Cedar Fair still should consult its own tax advisors.

Terp, who does...stuff...during the day, for pay, even, such as it is.

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This is AMAZING news. To me this is the best news since Banshee if it happens. Some of the classics have wonderful charm and energy. This is always something that I wanted them to do, but thought it was just a pipe dream.

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I'd like Conneaut to be able to live on it's own, however I think that time is sadly gone. Too little too late I fear, and that's what hurts the most.

It would be. I'm suggesting paying that for the RIDE. (The excess over fair market value may be considered a tax deduction--Cedar Fair would need to consult its tax advisors. Remember, the park is owned by a charitable trust.)

The amount could pay off the creditors and the park could get a fresh start.

And quit skimming posts (you missed that the carousel mechanic is working gratis, too.)

As long as the market value of the ride is below a certain percentage then the entire "gift" to the charitable organization would be tax deductible. Otherwise only part would be deductible. Much like donation requirements to purchase seats at college athletics are usually about 80% deductible.
Actually, your example proves its the opposite.

The portion above the fair market value is the contribution--in your example, 80 percent. Even when an item given the donor has only minimal value, its fair market value is still deducted from the amount given the donee. See pledge gifts from public broadcasting--just like your collegiate athletic seats.

Cedar Fair still should consult its own tax advisors.

Terp, who does...stuff...during the day, for pay, even, such as it is.

Basically a person or company should not receive more than 7-10% in value to make their gift tax deductible.

Adding to this post that most of my experience comes from working in collegiate athletics development. We have to watch how many gifts we give donors very closely specifically because of them being able to write off their donations.

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A question worth asking. Were there, (or are there currently), Bisch-Rocco flying scooters in Europe?

It would also be wonderful to see California Bingo Fascination back at KI. It's always fun at Indiana Beach.

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  We are? I've never even been there. 

  As to where, I have no idea. I'd love it if they found a set though. 

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This is great news for Cedar Fair Parks! I really want them to pick up an Enterprise or a Rotor. I have heard legendary stories about the Rotor from my dad, it seems like a cool and scary ride. Hope we get some classic European rides coming this way soon!

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There's still hope for Oktoberfest! Drunken Barrels, Rotor and Bayern Curve! Although I'd love to see the Cuddle Up, Whip , Tumblebug and Trabant return too....wow! Never realized until now how many flats have been removed....

You forgot the most important, The Rotor!

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CoSci had a rotor when I went there over 10 years ago. Unfortunately, its no longer there.

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Rotors don't really have a market anymore. They can be expensive to repair and maintain. They are way cooler than Gravitrons as the floors actually drop. However, the number of protein spills seems to be higher than the typical flat.

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Plus, in recalling the dropping floor- it was alright when it dropped, but sometimes it was shin stunning when it popped back up at the end. It didn't spring up, as I recall, but I do remember it hitting the soles of one's feet pretty solidly.

Also, the Rotor always attracted guys that would try to maneuver themselves into an awkward position on the wall, like upside down. I'm sure the floor coming up to meet their brain pan at the end of the ride didn't feel great.

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Yikes!

The only one I've been on with a dropping floor didn't come back up until after the ride had stopped. As it slowed down, we would slide down the side of the ride. We would then step into the center while the floor came back up so we could exit.

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Plus, in recalling the dropping floor- it was alright when it dropped, but sometimes it was shin stunning when it popped back up at the end. It didn't spring up, as I recall, but I do remember it hitting the soles of one's feet pretty solidly.

Also, the Rotor always attracted guys that would try to maneuver themselves into an awkward position on the wall, like upside down. I'm sure the floor coming up to meet their brain pan at the end of the ride didn't feel great.

 

Speaking of upside-down guys on Rotors, this popped up in the Old Photos of Cincinnati group on Facebook recently...

 

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This is reportedly from Coney Island in 1950. Courtesy of Facebook user Rose Taylor. Original post: http://on.fb.me/1JWperm

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Times were far different in 1950. Note also the guests leaning against the outer wall with their arms just inches from the rotating drum.

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If you're on Facebook, I highly recommend joining that group. There have been lots of old Coney and KI pictures popping up lately.

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I'll believe this when I see it. They had no problems getting rid of the last operating TOGO coaster in North America, also one of the few left operating in the world..

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Modern US park Rotors never allowed the floor to drop that far, even in the Seventies.

Why do Europeans get to have all the fun?

 

 

Probably because Europeans generally aren't as sue-happy as Americans are.

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I'll believe this when I see it. They had no problems getting rid of the last operating TOGO coaster in North America, also one of the few left operating in the world..

Absence makes the heart grow fonder.

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