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Mystic Timbers Construction Progress


stashua123

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With every new construction picture of this ride, I grow more and more excited.  I love Thunderhead at Dollywood, and can`t wait to have a GCI right in my backyard.  For those who have not experienced a GCI, you are in for a treat.  While it may not be the biggest, tallest, fastest or meanest ride, it will be loads of fun, which is what roller coasters are supposed to be!

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I hope that we will be flying through this crossover cause those bents almost look to make a straight line, rather than a curve.

Though a lot of people are expecting ejector, I think this coaster will have a lot of floater-ish like Diamondback and like Racers hills (the ones that actually have airtime still)

Instagram.com/kingsislandpr

Edit- there's another post by them as a slideshow where we can actually see the drop heading towards the lagoon. Also, bents are up... near the station maybe? The picture had a lonely set of bents next to nothing

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With every new construction picture of this ride, I grow more and more excited.  I love Thunderhead at Dollywood, and can`t wait to have a GCI right in my backyard.  For those who have not experienced a GCI, you are in for a treat.  While it may not be the biggest, tallest, fastest or meanest ride, it will be loads of fun, which is what roller coasters are supposed to be!

I was always excited, but i wasn't like "woah" untilI saw them building the island in the WWC reservoir.  That's going to be really cool.  

 

I think if you haven't ridden a GCI, you can throw out everything you know about wooden coasters with the Millennium Flyer trains.  They can make tight turns with ease and can give pain-free airtime.  I agree with those who say it's like riding a wooden coaster on a couch.

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^^ I'll agree with the first 2 drops having good floater airtime, but from the video rendering they look like small little pops on the track making me think this coaster will mostly have ejector airtime. Either way I'm gonna be happy, because every GCI I have ridden has been outstanding and usually in the top 3 of the park. Also the Lagoon crossing should offer a very cool and unique experience that most locals will not have experienced. 

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Possibly dumb question: why are they called "bents"? It seems like an odd name for something made up out of typically straight pieces (unless I'm totally missing something). I admit I haven't been following the construction as closely as most people on here, so maybe I have missed something. :P

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Possibly dumb question: why are they called "bents"? It seems like an odd name for something made up out of typically straight pieces (unless I'm totally missing something). I admit I haven't been following the construction as closely as most people on here, so maybe I have missed something. :P

 

 

I wasn't sure myself, and in doing a quick research online, even the engineers aren't sure. It seems like its an old old term that stuck. The speculation that seems most logical to me is that in railways, they used to bind the pieces together by bending the ends together. So when assembled they were "bent"  

 

Still, thats all speculation as it seems like no one knows the exact origins that I could find. 

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Possibly dumb question: why are they called "bents"? It seems like an odd name for something made up out of typically straight pieces (unless I'm totally missing something). I admit I haven't been following the construction as closely as most people on here, so maybe I have missed something. :P

I have always wondered that myself, because basically all it really is , is an elaborate train trestle support structure with varying heights if you think about it.

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My only idea for why it's called Bents is that when the ride is operating the wooden structure will bend and sway. 

Don't be alarmed though if you haven't seen that before. It's a common theme, if rides didn't do this, they might actually fracture. High skyscrapers also sway. 

If you ever watch Diamondback as it comes down it's first drop, the track will bend downwards, and after the train has passed, one of the yellow support columns will also sway back and forth. They're suppose to do this.

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Technically, they are footings, not footers.  Most people call them footers, but that is more of a slang term that is often used interchangeably with footings.

 

The batter brace is there to carry the lateral loads to the footings.  The chords and cross bracing also help to do that, but also prevent the bent posts from buckling.  

 

Brings back memories of my structures class in architecture school.  In my structures class, we had to design a column, as well as a 5' long bridge made entirely of wood and glue (no mechanical fasteners) that had to support three people.  No single member could have been longer than 3' and we were not allowed to laminate members together (we could only glue 20% of the surface area). The goal was to have the best weight supported to weight of bridge ratio (Ie, the design intent was for the bridge to fail the moment a fourth person stepped on it).

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Figuring out why they're called bents could leave you digging around for a looong time. Like trying to figure out why the main box for a car is called a frame. Or why a pen is called a pen.. maybe there's a root origins.. but it's likely not an english one unless it's a newer term.

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"A bent in American English is a framework composed of several structural members that defines the cross-section of a timber frame building or supports a trestle. In British English this assembly is called a "cross frame". The term bent is probably an archaic past tense of the verb to bind, referring to the way the timbers of a bent are joined together"

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bent_(structural)

10 seconds.

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"A bent in American English is a framework composed of several structural members that defines the cross-section of a timber frame building or supports a trestle. In British English this assembly is called a "cross frame". The term bent is probably an archaic past tense of the verb to bind, referring to the way the timbers of a bent are joined together"

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bent_(structural)

10 seconds.

Burnt lol
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I like how Don said in that email how easily we could see the ride once the leaves fell. I don't see it being that much easier to see anything, as stated above due to the lift hill.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

Well i am pretty sure he meant be able to  see it better from the Diamondback cam, and on a computer screen at full screen and NOT from a phone. Also, the trees still have a bit to go before they are naked. LOL but yeah. you wont see detail like when viewing the lifthill cam. That is for sure.

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If i lived locally in that area, i would find out where the carpenters on the job go for a beer after work or whatnot and go there and socialize and make a friend or two, then bribe em a bit with a few $ and a few drinks and get them to snap a few pics for me each day.

 

  Coaster stalker? That's a new one to me. haha!

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It's kind of interesting to see how they get all the Cords and cross bracing pieced up there to tie all the batter braces together for the lift hill. Looks from i can tell like a simple rope and pulley type of system. Although i must say it seemed to go rather slowly, i've done framing before myself, and something like that where the cords and cross bracing pieces for that entire section are all the same, the guy on the ground would have a simple jig made up to make cutting and boring the holes go quickly. But then again, those boys are working the day after Thanksgiving, I usually have that off, like most people i know. So i can understand not wanting to be super thrilled about working today. LOL 

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