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Coronavirus Impacting Theme Parks

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30 minutes ago, King Ding Dong said:

Well since it is a slow night...as the father of two aspiring engineering teens that have absolutely zero interest in any high school social functions I just can’t stop laughing at this.  
(obviously doctored)

 

 

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I mean, they're not wrong at all...

(I was an engineering student it's okay :lol:)

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1 hour ago, King Ding Dong said:

Soooooorry -UAlberta

I’m just joking. To be fair, campus life is usually like that, including today!

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40 minutes ago, TombRaiderFTW said:

Engineer here. What is a "romantic partner?" Is that a kind of calculator?

My TI-83+ is a great companion...

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My 14yo is trying to get into OSU next year to take some math and CS classes.  Mom was really not liking this idea until I explained that with just math, programming and maybe a stats or physics class eventually, between 8 and noon how much trouble can he possibly get in?

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A manufacturer of smart thermometers is publishing aggregated data of recorded fevers by region. A heat map is available, and the current data (as of March 19) is interesting: https://healthweather.us/

To be clear, the hot spots on the map are not necessarily caused by COVID-19. Still, the last place I'd want to be right now is a beach in Florida.

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There it is

This is a CP post but applies chainwide. 

Parks and offices close at 5:00PM, work from home until April 5th.  Going to be some interesting training going on.  

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28 minutes ago, King Ding Dong said:

There it is

This is a CP post but applies chainwide. 

Parks and offices closed, work from home until April 5th.  Going to be some interesting training going on.  

People need to remember this quote from above when someone asks the park what is replacing Vortex and they reply nothing is currently planned:

 "It is important to remember that Cedar Fair is a publicly traded company and that affects the type and timing of our communication."

And oh yeah this statement impacts their response to the virus too:P

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2 hours ago, gforce1994 said:

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The people thinking this will be done by summer time are missing the big picture. The "surge" in California is supposed to last for at least 8 weeks and they did little to no social distancing to prepare, they were reactionary unlike Ohio who has been proactive in their approach. Ohio is working to avoid a surge but that means we will be dealing with it for much longer, I have heard prediction as long as 6-9 months by educated sources.  For those who might be just joining in, we are trying to flatten the curve. This is just the idea we will have lets say 50,000 people in Ohio who get COVID19 and need hospitalized. Now if all 50,000 people get it in the same month, we are screwed.  This would overwhelm out current system by at least a doubling if not tripling of COVID19 patients plus you have to add on the general medical and trauma patients. This means hospitals would be operating at 200-300+% capacity.  If we can stretch those same 50K people over 6 months, now hospitals are at 150% capacity and with the cancellation of elective procedures it hopefully will be brought down to closer to 125% of capacity which is a surge the system can absorb. We want this to drag on for as long as possible, because that means someone else gets to live and we don't burn out our healthcare workers and give them all even worse PTSD.

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38 minutes ago, flightoffear1996 said:

Just curious as to what China did?  They seem to heading toward recovery. As well as some

other countries. 

China choose the fast and furious route and paid the price in human lives. We are trying the slow and methodical to save lives.

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Just now, MDMC01 said:

Within the past 24 hours, I've noticed at least two TV commercials (Subway and O'Charley's) that specifically advertise a To-Go option or the ordering from apps (because social distancing due to cornavirus). I thought this was an interesting way of how COVID-19 is affecting daily life. 

I quoted myself when I just posted in the Random Food Discussion Thread ^, but I'm curious on how others have seen COVID-19 affect daily life (besides social distancing measures, working from home and events being cancelled).

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1 hour ago, flightoffear1996 said:

Just curious as to what China did?  They seem to heading toward recovery. As well as some

other countries. 

Total lockdown, closed all businesses except those that are actually essential.  Only allowed to leave your home in the event of an emergency.  Sent doctors, and nurses from around the country to the effected area.  Implemented good quarantine practices among workers at the hospitals, basically two layers of protective barriers, swapped the outer layer between patients, with specific designated areas where they removed the protective barriers.  Ramped up production of needed medical supplies and made sure hospitals were fully stocked with whatever was needed.  They also tested a lot of people.

China is lifting restrictions, and sending the health care workers home.  You might not trust the numbers but it’s obvious they consider the outbreak contained.

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@MDMC01
Starting to see a lot of “How to Cook” articles online right now.  It is often said it takes 3 weeks to learn a new habit.  As restrictions eventually ease will be interesting if the it sticks at all, which could be bad for the restaurant industry, or pent up demand and boredom with home cooking staples like meatloaf causes a sustained increase going out.  The economic distress many will be in for some time may tend towards the former.  The weather hasn’t been very conducive to outdoor cooking recently unfortunately.  I hope to get smoker fired up this weekend.

Sleep schedules have gotten out of whack in my house and that needs to be fixed ASAP.  One class started a 7:50AM online checkin with a group chat which is helping force the issue. Keeping to a schedule is important. 

Also the need to schedule some exercise breaks. A lot less walking occurs when you are home all day and don’t go out.  A good idea to get out that pedometer so you can see how much.  
 

 

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8 hours ago, disco2000 said:

People need to remember this quote from above when someone asks the park what is replacing Vortex and they reply nothing is currently planned:

 "It is important to remember that Cedar Fair is a publicly traded company and that affects the type and timing of our communication."

And oh yeah this statement impacts their response to the virus too:P

We should all make that quote an auto text shortcut to respond to any post along the lines of “The Park needs to say something about XYZ now!”  It is easy to forget sometimes.

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One thing that I think could help our fight against the Virus is population density. The places hit the hardest in America are the urban city regions: Seattle, NYC, Cambridge, Cleveland, SF. Overall the population density is much lower than Italy and China.

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47 minutes ago, gforce1994 said:

One thing that I think could help our fight against the Virus is population density. The places hit the hardest in America are the urban city regions: Seattle, NYC, Cambridge, Cleveland, SF. Overall the population density is much lower than Italy and China.

Very true, I would *expect* more rural areas to fare far better than urban.  However age demographics tend to be older in rural areas and complacency can set in with a false sense of security.  
 

The usual social gathering places such as churches, the general store in town, barber shop, greasy spoon diner etc. can still be spreading grounds all it takes is one. With the older populations we *potentially* could see small towns devastated with very high infection and mortality rates.  Add to that the long existing problem healthcare access with rural hospitals folding at an alarming rate.   Many of those needing intensive care will have to be brought to the cities further overwhelming the system.  
 

One thing I really started to notice when I moved to Ohio and our travels up to CP or south to scout camps is how much different rural Ohio is compared to rural areas farther west like Missouri.  It feels far more dense and developed here. 

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Don't know what else to do other than to take this day by day but one thing I do know is a I think the world has forever changed. 

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13 minutes ago, flightoffear1996 said:

Don't know what else to do other than to take this day by day but one thing I do know is a I think the world has forever changed. 

This.  I think most anyone that was an adult for 9/11 can attest society changed significantly. Though not all for worse, definitely different.  For those younger Sandy Hook was a major turning point as well.

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3 hours ago, Enchanted Voyage Lover said:

The one thing that continues going around in my mind, why should we believe anything China tells us?

Why should we believe anything any government tells us? I like to take anything anyone says with a grain of salt until I can verify it myself. I know this sub isn't for politics and I 100% agree with that rule, but out our national government has had an interesting history of the information shared during this crisis.  Not pointing blame at any one person or group, just pointing out that every source of information should be vetted before you trust it.

43 minutes ago, gforce1994 said:

One thing that I think could help our fight against the Virus is population density. The places hit the hardest in America are the urban city regions: Seattle, NYC, Cambridge, Cleveland, SF. Overall the population density is much lower than Italy and China.

This is exactly why we can't compare our positive test rate to any other country. It is such a simplistic comparison that it really make the resulting analysis suspect.  Unless information is in things such as a per capita rate or the like, it isn't a fir comparison. Then if you factor in each individual states first day of infection and any measures they may be taking to combat the spread, it is pretty hard to look at this pandemic from a nationwide perspective.  For instance NYC is being devastated, but here in Ohio we are pretty much business as normal when it comes to hospitals.  I do not have a stats background, but I am very curios to see the data and analysis once the experts have time to study the pandemic.

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The thing I can't wrap my head around is the length of this.  Its one thing to ask people or forcibly shut down everything for 2-3 weeks.  But beyond that, people gotta work.  Some truly have to work, but think about the chain of command over a long time.  Doctors, nurses, grocery store workers, etc... all need to work, that is obvious, but what about the things that support those fields, like farmers, factory workers, clothing manufactrers, etc...  Then what about the people that support those people who need roads to work one and buildings to work in, HVAC equipment repaired, cars need repaired, etc...  Then you are looking at your neighbor getting out everyday to do work and you want to do something as well, get our of your house apartment, etc...  Can we expect the government to pay for the existence of everyone in the country for an extended period?

My point, at some point, life has to return to a somewhat normal state.  Perhaps small adjustments can be made but it can't/won't last forever.  My wife is a teacher, and yes the at home deal has been a pain in the ass, but that is something that can be adjusted to and maintained for longer, however I'm sitting in my office right now going thru my daily routine.  I'm pretty well self isolated, have about 800-1000 sq foot to no one but myself, but if a true shut down last long, work will dry up, then what?  what about the guys we hire to actually install/build the designs I make?  What about the vendors that supply that equipment and their support staff?  As you can see, it spreads out quickly and touches all aspects of society.  I feel that if the charts are to believed (and they are created by people much smarter than I, so I won't argue with them, just observe) all we are doing is attempting to buy time, eventually society is going to have to pull the bandaid off; but when?

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10 minutes ago, medford said:

The thing I can't wrap my head around is the length of this.  Its one thing to ask people or forcibly shut down everything for 2-3 weeks.  But beyond that, people gotta work.  Some truly have to work, but think about the chain of command over a long time.  Doctors, nurses, grocery store workers, etc... all need to work, that is obvious, but what about the things that support those fields, like farmers, factory workers, clothing manufactrers, etc...  Then what about the people that support those people who need roads to work one and buildings to work in, HVAC equipment repaired, cars need repaired, etc...  Then you are looking at your neighbor getting out everyday to do work and you want to do something as well, get our of your house apartment, etc...  Can we expect the government to pay for the existence of everyone in the country for an extended period?

My point, at some point, life has to return to a somewhat normal state.  Perhaps small adjustments can be made but it can't/won't last forever.  My wife is a teacher, and yes the at home deal has been a pain in the ass, but that is something that can be adjusted to and maintained for longer, however I'm sitting in my office right now going thru my daily routine.  I'm pretty well self isolated, have about 800-1000 sq foot to no one but myself, but if a true shut down last long, work will dry up, then what?  what about the guys we hire to actually install/build the designs I make?  What about the vendors that supply that equipment and their support staff?  As you can see, it spreads out quickly and touches all aspects of society.  I feel that if the charts are to believed (and they are created by people much smarter than I, so I won't argue with them, just observe) all we are doing is attempting to buy time, eventually society is going to have to pull the bandaid off; but when?

I think that is pretty much what everyone is wondering right now.

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You know, while we've been having great conversations, there are certain past members of these forums that I wish were still around to give their perspective on the situation.
Terpy comes to mind.

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I think right now the main goal is prevent or try to prevent overwhelming the hospitals. Some people are going to die but if we don't have ventilators to those who need it and could be saved they will die too. 

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It does have to end at some point.  This is all an experiment and we don’t really know if it will work.  The thought of millions and millions dying is just to much for most modern society to handle. Post WWII we have become to believe it just couldn’t happen with the exception of a WW III.  We are about to test that belief.

What we view as untimely death was just a way of life for the older generations.  These days we expect everything to go well with childbirth, that wasn’t always the case, it was very dangerous for the mother and infant.  All my grandparents had multiple siblings that died by birth or at a very young age.  

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For me personally it's a reminder to slow down and live each day like it might be your last. Just hopefully America will stand United again and we will be beat this. We just need to follow the advice and take it say by day. 

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5 hours ago, Enchanted Voyage Lover said:

The one thing that continues going around in my mind, why should we believe anything China tells us?

I like to think that it is because they are also a caring country and know that we are all in this together...but if you don’t choose to believe that...it’s because they have to keep us alive in order for us to keep buying those worthless McDonalds Happy Meal toys! ;)

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