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Top Thrill Dragster Incident


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1 minute ago, BeeastFarmer said:

And that is what she should have --kept her own  notes.  Maybe she thought that CP would supress the incident report to mitigate their liability.  Or maybe she thought when she posted it that she would capitalize on her act of being a hero (in this time of medical workers being heroes, there is some pressure to one up the others).   All in all, a horrible decision that was in very poor judgement.

I will not search for the report and I do not know the gender of the nurse, but I went along with "she" even though she might be a he. I don't like to contribute to the stereotype, but sometimes I do ;)

 

the victims name is not on the report the nurse did.  There is no issues.

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If the nurse posting it is true, it probably had more to do with the desire to seem important and a hero and break the story...

There are other ways the nurse could have had ensured her report wasn't lost and still be ethical.  An investigation is going to be done by many parties and she could provide a copy to each one of those agencies that should have access to that to begin with.  Let them be the ones that say "hey we got this report from a guest and it is filled out on your paper so you had it in your possession at one time, yet you didn't provide this to us, why is that?"  Then the investigation could start on if they were trying to hide facts to minimize exposure.

But to post it on social media, one is usually looking for attention and that is a shame to disregard any oath or ethical requirements as part of that job, even if off duty.

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3 minutes ago, coaster sally said:

the victims name is not on the report the nurse did.  There is no issues.

In your world.  If you knew the ethical, moral and legal obligations of a caregiver to a patient, you would understand why the nurse should have never posted anything about the incident.  

I won't engage with you further because, based on previous posts you have made, you seem to think that you are always correct.

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9 minutes ago, BeeastFarmer said:

And that is what she should have --kept her own  notes.  Maybe she thought that CP would supress the incident report to mitigate their liability.  Or maybe she thought when she posted it that she would capitalize on her act of being a hero (in this time of medical workers being heroes, there is some pressure to one up the others).   All in all, a horrible decision that was in very poor judgement.

I will not search for the report and I do not know the gender of the nurse, but I went along with "she" even though she might be a he. I don't like to contribute to the stereotype, but sometimes I do ;)

 

All I have to say is if she was worried about CP covering stuff up, did she also think Sandusky Fire Dept would collude with the park to make the report disappear?  Agreed on it being poor judgment indeed.  Would it even be a good idea to post she was there and stepped up to help?

I saw mention that sounded like a female nurse, but this was after the post was apparently deleted so I can't confirm.  Haven't seen the post itself.

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18 minutes ago, Browntggrr said:

Her intent may have been to eliminate rumors.

I'm not sure if either way would be a good decision.

Her intent is unknown.  It could be just what you mentioned, it could be that she wants 10 minutes of fame, or it could be terrible discernment.  It's completely the wrong thing to do and any healthcare worker should know better.

It's no different than an ED trauma nurse posting his notes from the arrival at the ED.  "The patient was brought in by EMS and had injuries and....(medical jargon)...But I didn't mention a name or anything.  I just want to keep ahead of the rumors that are bound to happen."

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9 minutes ago, Browntggrr said:

10 minutes of fame is pretty harsh.

Given the same situation, If someone stepped up to help my daughter that could potentially save her life, I would be indebted to her for life.

10 min of fame may sound harsh, but that is what social media is grooming people to do....maybe that isn't the case here and it simply was a lapse of judgement, but probably more attention seeking if one saw the report...

A true professional (or really anyone for that matter) would have rendered aid because that is the right thing to do without seeking glory or making a big deal about it.

But wouldn't you be more indebted if they didn't post the gory details and pictures of said injuries?

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5 minutes ago, disco2000 said:

But wouldn't you be more indebted if they didn't post the gory details and pictures of said injuries?

Absolutely not as there is nothing to hide.

No names given, just the facts.

A horrendous accident that was not my daughter's fault in the least bit.  That is where social media would try to destroy her as accidents like this are rare- unless accompanied by a mistake on the victim's part.  The report given squashes such rumors.

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Given that there is the potential for the public to learn the identity of the patient, medical details reported by a medical professional could be traced back to a specific individual, thus at best posing an ethical concern, if not an outright HIPAA violation.  If there's even a chance you could connect the medical details with a specific individual, that's got to be a no-no without patient consent.

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1 hour ago, Browntggrr said:

10 minutes of fame is pretty harsh.

Given the same situation, If someone stepped up to help my daughter that could potentially save her life, I would be indebted to her for life.

But does posting it save her life? She should most certainly lose her job for that in my opinion. 

You just do not do that. That is taught your first year studying medicine/nursing/paramedic or any medical related field. I think that is so inappropriate.

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Back to TTD, I do wonder if it will become the chain's next SOB. Its too early to speculate, and I'm sure the woman's condition will play a role in what happens down the road. The que itself will be modified, I feel like that's a given, but what about long term? Will people still want to ride it if it reopens? Will it be worth it financially to reopen it at all? 

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2 minutes ago, SonofBaconator said:

Back to TTD, I do wonder if it will become the chain's next SOB. Its too early to speculate, and I'm sure the woman's condition will play a role in what happens down the road. The que itself will be modified, I feel like that's a given, but what about long term? Will people still want to ride it if it reopens? Will it be worth it financially to reopen it at all? 

It is the star attraction, people will ride

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7 minutes ago, SonofBaconator said:

Back to TTD, I do wonder if it will become the chain's next SOB. Its too early to speculate, and I'm sure the woman's condition will play a role in what happens down the road. The que itself will be modified, I feel like that's a given, but what about long term? Will people still want to ride it if it reopens? Will it be worth it financially to reopen it at all? 

I'm sure people will still ride it, but there may be a slight dip in popularity for a bit. I hope they don't modify the queue too much because I love the view you get of the ride when in line.

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23 minutes ago, SonofBaconator said:

The que itself will be modified, I feel like that's a given, but what about long term? Will people still want to ride it if it reopens?

Easier said than done.  How do you modify the queue in a way that you maintain visibility of the ride, of the returning trains with the grins on everyone's faces - a key part of the guest experience is seeing others enjoy it - yet have a strong enough barrier that a relatively small bolt (for instance, we don't know that's what it was here) can't get through?  Given that it doesn't appear to have been a failure of the launch system, I'm left to wonder if they would, then, need to build similar anti-shrapnel defenses around all rides.  What do you do where Corkscrew, well, corkscrews over the midway?  Etc.

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15 minutes ago, KI FANATIC 37 said:

But does posting it save her life? She should most certainly lose her job for that in my opinion. 

 

I strongly disagree, but to each their own.  I totally respect your opinion.

She stepped up, and could have (hopefully) saved a life.  What she did in the aftermath is overlooking what she did.

That being said, I do not envision TTD making a comeback.

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3 hours ago, disco2000 said:

If the nurse posting it is true, it probably had more to do with the desire to seem important and a hero and break the story...

There are other ways the nurse could have had ensured her report wasn't lost and still be ethical.  An investigation is going to be done by many parties and she could provide a copy to each one of those agencies that should have access to that to begin with.  Let them be the ones that say "hey we got this report from a guest and it is filled out on your paper so you had it in your possession at one time, yet you didn't provide this to us, why is that?"  Then the investigation could start on if they were trying to hide facts to minimize exposure.

But to post it on social media, one is usually looking for attention and that is a shame to disregard any oath or ethical requirements as part of that job, even if off duty.

Like that dude who filmed the Coney brawl, uploaded the footage to social media, made it clear he was available for interviews, and then claimed he was interested in helping those kids?

#NotAllHerosWearCapes

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steel_Dragon_2000

 

"In August 2003, a sheared axle caused one of the trains to lose a wheel. A passenger suffered a serious back injury and a 28-year-old man swimming in the water park pool was injured when he was hit in the hip with the 32 centimetres (13 in) wheel.[7][8] The ride was closed for almost three years and reopened in 2006.[9]"

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18 hours ago, jsus said:

TBH I didn't really need to suggest Toledo.  Cleveland is far more likely, unless they don't have capacity.  Trauma patients likely aren't "competing" with COVID-19 patients, though, so the point holds.

WKYC has a bit more detail, and some bodycam footage presumably from a SPD officer who responded as the patient was prepared for transport to the ambulance.

Interestingly, they state that the patient indeed was transferred to Toledo, not Cleveland.

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1 hour ago, Browntggrr said:

I strongly disagree, but to each their own.  I totally respect your opinion.

She stepped up, and could have (hopefully) saved a life.  What she did in the aftermath is overlooking what she did.

That being said, I do not envision TTD making a comeback.

What she did to render aid is admirable.  But she did what any HCP would do, to the best of their ability.  And in they eyes of any HCP who would hear about this, they would doubt her professional integrity, values, morals and ethics.  The best skilled HCP who saves a life devalues his or her standing when they make such a stupid mistake.  Patient privacy is pillar of professionalism and hopefully her actions will have consequences.  

I have rendered aid many times outside  the walls of the hospital and would never speak of  that out of respect for the patient. My students get it drilled into their heads about not speaking about what they experience in the clinical setting.  Unfortunately, this may because a case in point for health care students in the future.

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1 hour ago, SonofBaconator said:

I never understood how a ride's popularity trumps the fact that it hurt someone. People will naturally be drawn away from it unless changes are made.

I don’t think this story is getting much media attention as a rollercoaster incident normally would. This is based completely off my own personal experience but none of my friends (who know I’m into rollercoasters) have mentioned the accident at all to me. If most guests aren’t that aware of the incident then I don’t think the rides popularity would take a severe hit. Personally speaking, I’m not eager at all to ride TTD anytime in the near future.

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1 hour ago, SonofBaconator said:

I never understood how a ride's popularity trumps the fact that it hurt someone. People will naturally be drawn away from it unless changes are made.

Is there an NTSB for roller-coaster issues? I imagine it playing out something like an airline crash investigation. Once you find out what went wrong, you fix it. Hoards of people will get back on and fly again another day. As much as the bottom-line can handle the down-time, that is.

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