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Time Laps of Snow Flake Lake Conversion


IndyGuy4KI
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Here is a time laps video of the Royal Fountain being transformed into the ice skating rink Snow Flake Lake for Winterfest. It took workers three and half weeks to install the 240 feet. x 78 feet wide rink and 30,000 gallons of water to create its icy surface. Winterfest is open select nights in November and December. More information and tickets are available at visitkingsisland.com.

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By my observations, snowflake lake is using 600 tons of cooling to make the ice. That's pretty bonkers.

There are three 200-ton Aggreko chillers in the fenced enclosure behind the Zamboni garage. For the other nerds out there- that's 7,200,000 BTU/hr of cooling, or 200 times larger than the typical home air conditioning system. 

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18 minutes ago, DeltaFlyer said:

By my observations, snowflake lake is using 600 tons of cooling to make the ice. That's pretty bonkers.

There are three 200-ton Aggreko chillers in the fenced enclosure behind the Zamboni garage. For the other nerds out there- that's 7,200,000 BTU/hr of cooling, or 200 times larger than the typical home air conditioning system. 

Sooo… what’s the average cost per hour to keep the ice frozen?

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1 hour ago, BoddaH1994 said:

Sooo… what’s the average cost per hour to keep the ice frozen?

That would depend on a lot of factors- outside air temp, how much the chillers are cycling, their efficiency, etc. 

Assuming they are using all 3 chillers at about 80% capacity (typical safety margin), that would be 7.2 MBtu/hr * 0.8 = 5.76 MBtu/hr / 0.003412 Mbtu/hr/kW = 1688.15 kW of thermal power. Using a COP of 2.8, these would consume approximately 602 kW of electrical power. At $0.097 per kWh, this would place the running cost at $58.39 per hour

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3 hours ago, DeltaFlyer said:

That would depend on a lot of factors- outside air temp, how much the chillers are cycling, their efficiency, etc. 

Assuming they are using all 3 chillers at about 80% capacity (typical safety margin), that would be 7.2 MBtu/hr * 0.8 = 5.76 MBtu/hr / 0.003412 Mbtu/hr/kW = 1688.15 kW of thermal power. Using a COP of 2.8, these would consume approximately 602 kW of electrical power. At $0.097 per kWh, this would place the running cost at $58.39 per hour

That’s much cheaper than I thought. 
 

 

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18 hours ago, DeltaFlyer said:

That would depend on a lot of factors- outside air temp, how much the chillers are cycling, their efficiency, etc. 

Assuming they are using all 3 chillers at about 80% capacity (typical safety margin), that would be 7.2 MBtu/hr * 0.8 = 5.76 MBtu/hr / 0.003412 Mbtu/hr/kW = 1688.15 kW of thermal power. Using a COP of 2.8, these would consume approximately 602 kW of electrical power. At $0.097 per kWh, this would place the running cost at $58.39 per hour

Any chance you can use your Gödel-fu and calculate the hourly cost of running the fountains including the water loss?

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On 11/29/2021 at 11:26 AM, King Ding Dong said:

Any chance you can use your Gödel-fu and calculate the hourly cost of running the fountains including the water loss?

This is going to be assuming a whole lot of variables since I don't know the exact specs of the fountain, but here goes:

Fountain has 112 total nozzles (source). By observation, there are (26) 1" Finger Jet Nozzles, (26) 1.5" Geyser Nozzles, (6) 2" Geyser Nozzles, and (54) 1" Geyser Nozzles. Assuming Heights of 10 feet for the Finger Jets and 1.5" Geysers, 15 feet for the 1" Geysers, and 25 feet for the 2" Geysers. 

Nozzle Quantity Aperture Size (in) Height (ft)  Exit Velocity (ft/s) Flow Rate (each, gpm) Flow Rate (total, gpm)
1" Finger 26 1 10 25.38 62.1 1615.1
1" Geyser 54 1 15 31.08 76.1 4108.3
1.5" Geyser 26 1.5 10 25.38 139.8 3634.0
2" Geyser 6 2 25 40.12 392.9 2357.2
           

 Total: 11714.6

 

To size the pumps, I assumed a head of 150ft for each run. Total guesstimate, but it would be far too complicated to do any actual calculations to determine this, especially since the pipe runs to each nozzle are going to be in the 3-4" range to get the flow rates needed for the height. 

    HP Amps (@480/3Ø)       VA Basis of  Design
Pump 1 GPM 1615.1 100.0 124   103092  Grundfos   NBS 040-095/7.72
Pump 2 GPM 2054.152 121.0 156 129696  Grundfos  NBS 050-150/14.09
Pump 3 GPM 2054.152 121.0 156 129696  Grundfos   NBS 050-150/14.09
Pump 4 GPM 1816.975 100.0 124 103092  Grundfos NBS 040-095/7.72
Pump 5 GPM 1816.975 100.0 124 103092  Grundfos  NBS 040-095/7.72
Pump 6 GPM 1178.622 75.0 96 79813  Grundfos  NBS 030-095/7.36
Pump 7 GPM 1178.622 75.0 96 79813  Grundfos  NBS 030-095/7.36
      Total Power: 728293 VA  
        728 kVA  
      Cost Per Hour:                  $35.32    

 

So there you go- $35.32 an hour assuming a 50% demand factor on the pumps (those fountains aren't at full spray all the time). 

As far as water loss, on a typical summer day the evaporative losses come out to be about 2,400 gallons per hour. That is about $10/hr using the GCWW rates. 

What do you think so? - Imgflip

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