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Mattel park in The zone in Arizona


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  • westcoaster changed the title to Mattel park in The zone in Arizona

While it looks like a good concept, I have to wonder how many people would want to visit an amusement park in southwestern Arizona in the summer. Wikipedia says average highs out there are 90 or above between May and October.

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I lived in Las Vegas for a time in the early 2000s, and for probably the 1000th time since I lived in the southwest desert region, I will say that 90+ in Arizona and Nevada is ABSOLUTELY NOTHING like 90+ in the forsaken midwest or south.  Out there, 90+ is genuinely NOWHERE NEAR as ridiculous and exhausting as it is in this forsaken part of the country.  Is it hot?  Well yes, 90+ is "hot" period, but when its 90+ and 12-20% humidity that heat is truthfully quite bearable.  As long as the park operator actually cares about their guests comfort and happiness more than their coffers, and installs covered or enclosed queues with FUNCTIONAL mister fans, a guest with a bottle of water can and will handle a 1 hour wait for instance much better than one in this region where its consistently 50+% humidity.  The biggest concern in that region is remaining hydrated, and again as long as reasonable accommodations are made for that the park will do just fine.  The valid concern regarding this venture is the very rapidly worsening water supply conditions in the southwest desert region.... THAT is what will threaten the viability an existence of this.

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Glendale is  suburb of Phoenix, and by locals, Phoenix is is considered more central Arizona.  Ironically, Phoenix is hotter than Tuscon which is considered southern AZ.

October-May will be golden for this park for outdoor attractions.  It seems they have a good mix of indoor attractions as well.

Interestingly, before Covid, there was a proposed huge entertainment complex in development for Casa Grande.  This is between Phoenix and Tuscon.  If that ever comes to fruition, it will be very interesting.  

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15 hours ago, IBEW_Sparky said:

I lived in Las Vegas for a time in the early 2000s, and for probably the 1000th time since I lived in the southwest desert region, I will say that 90+ in Arizona and Nevada is ABSOLUTELY NOTHING like 90+ in the forsaken midwest or south.  Out there, 90+ is genuinely NOWHERE NEAR as ridiculous and exhausting as it is in this forsaken part of the country.  Is it hot?  Well yes, 90+ is "hot" period, but when its 90+ and 12-20% humidity that heat is truthfully quite bearable.  As long as the park operator actually cares about their guests comfort and happiness more than their coffers, and installs covered or enclosed queues with FUNCTIONAL mister fans, a guest with a bottle of water can and will handle a 1 hour wait for instance much better than one in this region where its consistently 50+% humidity.  The biggest concern in that region is remaining hydrated, and again as long as reasonable accommodations are made for that the park will do just fine.  The valid concern regarding this venture is the very rapidly worsening water supply conditions in the southwest desert region.... THAT is what will threaten the viability an existence of this.

This is what I've said for a while. The area is clearly ripe for a good, large amusement park and dry heat is always better than the crazy humidity we get as long as water is available. If they could have good water rides (would water limits cause an issue?) area people might flock to it.

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2 hours ago, DoomPlague said:

This is what I've said for a while. The area is clearly ripe for a good, large amusement park and dry heat is always better than the crazy humidity we get as long as water is available. If they could have good water rides (would water limits cause an issue?) area people might flock to it.

Water rights are very contentious west of the breadbasket.  Lakes Powell and Mead are at historic lows right now, and the water from the Colorado River supplies water as far north as Idaho and as far south as Mexico.  

When I lived in Phoenix 15 years ago, there was a push to convert grass into xeriscape.  But water still flowed like liquid gold.  (I still miss my pool!).  Many golf courses were making the switch to grey water and the use of it was being explored further.  The golf course that my rental house backed up to used it.  I'd venture a guess that some of the water in developments will be grey water.

 

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