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Diamondback Construction Thread (Updated 3-19-09)

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http://www.KICentral.com/photos/displayima...m=278&pos=2

In this picture that someone had a question about... I am guessing you are talking about the place where the 2 rows of bolts are holding the bottom part to the spine itself?

Well, I would assume it is there so if the track doesn't sit just right, or needs to be tilted in anyway to match the previous of preceeding peice they can loosen those bolts and adjust it acordingly. After it is in the right possition, they tighten them up. also this will help reduce stress on the track itself, as I would imagine they give a little under the weight of the train.

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^Indeed it is! I'm looking forward to DB to slither back into the woods for the OVERBANK turn.

I'm hoping that we'll be able to see it fom the highway.

I'm looking forward to when you stop holding so strong to an opinion no one agrees with!

But yes, Diamondback now has it's first completed hill, bottom to top to bottom. That drop into the ravine's looking pretty sweet.

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WHOA! Who said I was fighting?? I don't believe there were any fighting words used in my past 2 posts.

But I'm not going to sit here and have this cyber "argument" over a bolded word. That's not my style.

All I'm saying is, Behemoth's, Nitro's, Silver Star's turns are completely different looking than DB's. And their turns are called Hammerhead turns. DB's doesn't look that much like it.

Alright. Let's stop the silly little arguments, and move on.

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All I'm saying is, Behemoth's, Nitro's, Silver Star's turns are completely different looking than DB's. And their turns are called Hammerhead turns. DB's doesn't look that much like it.

Ok if Diamondback's doesn't look like those, then here you go.

dbhh.jpg

DB HammerHead

nitrohh.jpg

Nitro HammerHead

sshh.jpg

SilverStar HammerHead

bhh.jpg

Behemoth HammerHead

bhh2.jpg

Behemoth Layout Depiction of HammerHead

Uhhh I think they all look pretty similar, so if you call one a HammerHead, I think you need to call them all a HammerHead...

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^Well take a look at the way that Silver Star, Behemoth, Nitro go into the hammerhead. As they go into it, they curve to the right then curve to the left into the turn. But in Nitro's case, it's the opposite turn.

But in DB's case, it goes straight into the turn. Take BLSC for example, it goes straight into the turn, and its called an overbank. DB does the same exact thing.

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Go back and read post #1062 and it is clearly explained the aviation definition of a HammerHead. Now in a true sense it is impossible for any circuit coaster to make a hammerhead turn because the train would need to stall and reverse course. But as we know B&M are famous for naming elements on their coasters after aviation manuvers. Once again you may find it as an overbanked turn on a non B&M but on a B&M they will refer to it as a HammerHead. It is all for marketing and advertising. Enough said.

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Alright. You know what?

If it'll make everyone here happy. I'll start calling it a hammerhead.

I'm very sorry for expressing my opinion.

EDIT: Well that explains it there. I forgot that B&M names elements differently than Premier, Vekoma, etc.

So this conversation is over. Enough said.

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Honestly, what difference does it make if B&M calls it one thing whilst Vekoma, Premier, etc call it another. I'ts still going to serve it's purpose and add to the thrill of the ride. They could call it a tickle giggle turn and I wouldn't care as long as it doesn't fall apart while in operation.

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I call them footers, even though they are truly footings. Kind of like calling all brands of facial tissue Klenex...

And from now on I will not refer to the turn as a HammerHead, from this day forth it is The Tickle Giggle Turn, love that...

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This time last year when CW was building Behemoth all they had done was the station track, brake run, and a tiny bit done on the lift hill. So DB is being built really fast. I know that DB started construction during the off season of 2007-2008 and Behemoth started in May 2007 but vertical construction didn't start until mid August for DB and until Mid September for Behemoth.

http://behemoth.canadaswonderland.com/publ...ry=construction

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I believe that I have an answer to the "weird connector piece" on Diamondback`s track. That splice plate (the small rectangular piece of steel that joins the portion connected to the column with the actual track piece is not there for alignment purposes. All the holes in that steel are just big enough to allow the bolts to slide in. Remember, this is a B&M coaster and design tolerances are extremely limited (like down to several millimeters).

That splice plate is actually a form of structural connection. I believe that it is a pin connection, which prevents the transfer of moment into the support. This also would explain why the flange from the track piece does not come into direct contact with the flange on the lower support piece. (Although, this may have nothing to do with a pinned connection, but rather a way to attempt to isolate vibrations in the track caused by the train from the support itself.) A moment is defined as a force times a distance and is typically measured in foot-pounds. Moment, or fixed, connections are extremely difficult and expensive to create, compared to pinned connections. Which for those wondering, fixed connections are almost impossible to achieve in wood construction. Almost all connections in wood are pinned connections. By contrast, most connections in concrete, inherently are fixed connections, although pinned connections are possible in concrete.

Now, you probably learned way more about connections in that little structures lesson than you cared to know about. As I stated, I`m not entirely sure if my answer is completely accurate, as I am not a structural engineer or coaster designer (I`m not even an architect, at least not yet) but I have taken four classes in structures at UC.

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^^You're in DAAP, right?

This time last year when CW was building Behemoth all they had done was the station track, brake run, and a tiny bit done on the lift hill. So DB is being built really fast. I know that DB started construction during the off season of 2007-2008 and Behemoth started in May 2007 but vertical construction didn't start until mid August for DB and until Mid September for Behemoth.

http://behemoth.canadaswonderland.com/publ...ry=construction

Although, Behemoth finished a month behind schedule and D-back will be opening (hopefully!) a few weeks before Behemoth did.

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I believe that I have an answer to the "weird connector piece" on Diamondback`s track. That splice plate (the small rectangular piece of steel that joins the portion connected to the column with the actual track piece is not there for alignment purposes. All the holes in that steel are just big enough to allow the bolts to slide in. Remember, this is a B&M coaster and design tolerances are extremely limited (like down to several millimeters).

That splice plate is actually a form of structural connection. I believe that it is a pin connection, which prevents the transfer of moment into the support. This also would explain why the flange from the track piece does not come into direct contact with the flange on the lower support piece. (Although, this may have nothing to do with a pinned connection, but rather a way to attempt to isolate vibrations in the track caused by the train from the support itself.) A moment is defined as a force times a distance and is typically measured in foot-pounds. Moment, or fixed, connections are extremely difficult and expensive to create, compared to pinned connections. Which for those wondering, fixed connections are almost impossible to achieve in wood construction. Almost all connections in wood are pinned connections. By contrast, most connections in concrete, inherently are fixed connections, although pinned connections are possible in concrete.

Now, you probably learned way more about connections in that little structures lesson than you cared to know about. As I stated, I`m not entirely sure if my answer is completely accurate, as I am not a structural engineer or coaster designer (I`m not even an architect, at least not yet) but I have taken four classes in structures at UC.

Thank you for the explanation. So basically by having that type of connection the idea is to prevent or lessen the wear on the supports? Possibly preventing them from cracking or excessive wear? Did I understand you correctly?

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