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What`s next for Son of Beast?


fighting31irish

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Like I've said before, they should consider the Lance Hart suggestion. And while I never rode it myself, I really want the chance to. It's the coaster enthusiast in me. If they tear down SoB, when where am I going to find another 200+ foot woodie? Will anything ever reach that height again, not counting prefabs? Will future woodies have loops?

Where will you find a 200 foot wooden coaster? I don't know. I have no question that a company like GCI could do it right, but would they want to? Son of Beast is not the only example, but perhaps it's one of the best to show that wooden coasters really ought not try to do what steel coasters can. Modern steel coasters can reach astounding heights, and incredible speed, and do intricate, quick maneuvers. All of the "best" traditional wooden coasters have fun transitions, terrain-following layouts, and a speed and height that make the old-fashioned "bumpiness" a fun part of the experience.

Why isn't that enough? Son of Beast decided to take statistics that had traditionally been reserved for steel rides (height, speed, inversions, length) and applied it to wood. Meanwhile, what if The Beast were made of steel? What would be the fun in its terrain-hugging curves and straight-aways if it were smooth as glass? Some might say the ride would be boring (though some say that as is).

Personally, I have no doubt that GCI could build a really nice hyper-coaster made of wood. But would they want to? And if they did, would any clients wish to pay what they would ask? Likewise, I think if anyone build a successful looping wooden roller coaster, it would be Intamin (specifically, with their plug-and-play model). But how many tens of millions would they ask, and would any client find their asking price to be worth it? Maybe! What I gather from stories around here is that RCCA was the only company Paramount Parks could find that would build a wooden loop. Then, both companies egged each other on, back and forth, until they decided to break every other record along with it. I don't know how true it is, but it's a shame - if they'd waited just a few more years, they could've gotten Intamin instead (after all, Intamin plug-and-play coasters are the #2, #3, and #4 tallest / fastest wooden coasters after Son of Beast).

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"If it doesn't run, take it down" is not the problem.

Well, no. "If it doesn't run, take it down" is not the problem, it's a possible answer.

If it liquidates people from the inside out with it's shaking, then it doesn't work as a coaster, but as a cement mixer on wheels with people thrown in. It's poorly designed, people were hurt, they do not run it. It sits in the park like a brontosaurus corpse taking up real estate.

Action Zone is an expanse of cement with some rides plunked down on it. It could use more rides- where that pile of wood happens to be setting.

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Remember, Son of Beast was not un popular. The loop was incredible the original trains were incredible. But this is not the first time in history Kings Island/former coney island had a un popular problem coaster, the Shooting star was built from a un popular ride at Coney retaining the lift hill and station.

I hope for all of us Son of Beast is a keeper even redone, to become an incredible ride.

Not to mention, sometimes kids need help, need tamed this is just a growing pain.

Son of Beast has to ride again!

To many crowds....

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Steel Phantom's Revenge?

And to many, the first incarnation of that ride was so uncomfortable that it's semi-demolition and "revenge" seemed like it might be even worse! And now...

May be a Sonny's Revenge? I hope. :D

I rode both El Toro and T-Express. They both are as smooth as Diamondback. I know.. I know.. However, the may be able to build some other parts the same way. Both T-Express and El Toro has a turn before the first hill. Prefab with urethane wheels may do the trick...

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If a mere change of trains would fix things, wouldn't it already have been done?

And if you built Timberliners and they weren't running at the first park you sold them to, would your marketing and reputation then be helped by selling Timberliners for use on Son of Beast?

I'm sorry, but that one doesn't even come close to passing the smell test. Who told you? The Dippin' Dots guy?

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Probably worth noting: the reputation of OTHER giant wooden coasters in the United States over 150 feet.

Son of Beast

Builder: RCCA

Height: 218' Drop: 214' Speed: 78.4mph, SBNO

The ride in question. Son of Beast is known for being an ultra-rough, jackhammering, painful, accident-prone wooden coaster ever since it made its debut in 2000. Poor construction may also be to blame.

El Toro, Six Flags Great Adventure

Builder: Intamin

Height: 181' Drop: 176' Speed: 70mph

Intamin Pre-Fab Coaster, not a traditional wooden coaster. Thus, no need to use it for comparison.

The Rattler, Six Flags Fiesta Texas

Builder: Not known according to RCDB, I belive this was a RCCA as well however

Height: 179.7' Drop: 124' (Originally 166') Speed: 65mph

Was the tallest wooden coaster in the world before Son of Beast opened. Originally opened with a 166' drop, however, numerous roughness complaints and problems forced the park to shorten it to a mere 124'. The ride is still considered very rough and appears in very few "best wooden coaster" lists.

The Voyage, Holiday World

Builder: The Gravity Group

Height: 163' Drop: 154' Speed: 67mph

Still "young". Voted one of the best wooden coasters in the world year after year, however, recently problems have begun to arise, mainly that the ride, as it has begun to age, has become rough. New trains, the Timberliners, are set to debut in 2012 to attempt to fix this problem. Dropped from 1st to 6th in Mitch Hawker's Coaster Poll last year. This is the only coaster I have personally ridden on this list, and while an amazing ride, my last ride on it jackhammered me from the bottom of the first drop to the final brakes. Ouch.

Mean Streak, Cedar Point

Builder: Dinn Corporation

Height: 161', Drop: 155', Speed: 65mph

Debuted in 1991 and was considered one of the world's best wooden roller coasters, however by the early 2000s it began to become known as "very rough". A re-tracking and re-build of the trains after a small fire this year seems to have helped it quite a bit, however, it may simply be a matter of time before it returns to its old, rough ways. Has been trimmed in an attempt to lesser the roughness, but this so far has done little other than make the ride "boring".

And, that's it for all the wooden coasters over 150' still in existence today in North America. Not very good, is it? Only El Toro, which is a pre-fab, has managed to escape becoming "very rough". Throw in the fact that Son of Beast was not well built (unlike coasters The Voyage, which were in their young years smooth and enjoyable), and thus never even had a "it was smooth when it opened" stage...and you have a serious problem. And neither Voyage, Rattler, nor Mean Streak have had serious accidents. Timberliners and a good re-tracking could probably help those 2 coasters (Voyage and Mean Streak), Son of Beast would very likely need something much, much more...Rattler probably needs more than Timberliners too, for that matter.

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What? Six Flags had nothing to do with Rattler's construction or second year modifications. They didn't even own the park then. Blame them for many other wooden coaster modifications (especially in California and Massachusetts), but not that one.

And you must have ridden a very different Mean Streak its first year than I did....

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McSalsa, I especially like your use of quotation marks to seemingly indicate legitimacy. Sources say it is "very rough" and "boring." Even Wikipedia editors would ask, "Who says this? Where?" It almost appears that you've paraphrased your own opinions and what you've heard and presented it as a general consensus...

And mccarthysnerd, your VERY reliable source may have let you down. One of the things to remember is that seasonal employees (ride operators, food workers, path sweepers, etc) are not intentionally told what the park's plans are. If you heard it from a ride operator or a "dippin' dots guy," you have not heard the truth. In fact, the ONLY people who have any inkling what Kings Island is up to are those in upper management, and those that upper management trusts - people who would never divulge that information for risk of losing their jobs or connections.

All that aside, Kings Island can consider whatever they want. As Terpy said, Gravity Group may not be willing to give Timberliners to Son of Beast no matter what Kings Island is willing to pay, period.

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Decisions of that type are NOT made by individual parks in the Cedar Fair chain. The company's leaders have made quite clear during conference calls that decisions about capital expenditures are made in Sandusky, Ohio, not in Mason, Doswell, Allentown, etc.

The mere fact it is stated that "Kings Island" is considering this discredits the source, in my opinion.

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Lots of users have said, "I heard from this person", " I heard from this ride op", "I heard it from the dippin dot guy/girl" when it comes to what new ride or what will happen with SOB. Kings Island and Cedar Fair is like the military when it comes to intel about new rides or combat action. It is classified at "top Secret" and only people that need to know are informed about future plans. Only the top management, CEO, GM's, the board, ect know the plans. Thier job will be at risk if they let it known ahead of time what is being planned. NO seasonal employee and even full time employees not in the loop know NOTHING about future plans. Now if an employee was to say on this board, which KI monitors, about what they might or think they know, they will be looking for a job pretty soon. So what ever rumor you might hear, from any site on the web, is just that, rumor. Until it has been released, it should be taken with a grain of salt.

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Terp, you didn't enjoy Mean Streak when it first opened? Granted, I was only 14, so perhaps my tolerance was different, but I remember loving it.

If you are lucky, you can still snag a trimless ride on Mean Streak every now and then. No, the operators can not manually turn the trims on and off, so don't ask them...it has to do with he weight of the trains that are dispatched and how quickly they run the course (I am not going to pretend to understand everything that goes into the equation).

But wow...when those trims are off...Mean Streak has enough speed to not jackhammer through the overbanks, and you will actually experience airtime, and a highly comfortable (for a woodie) ride. Totally different ride.

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When Mean Streak opened, I do remember it as being smoother. That being said, I still saw it as a coaster that had so much potential, but delivered so very little. Rampy, uninspired layout, taking no exciting turns whatsoever. Compare The Georgia Cyclone, Tremors, and other exciting wood coasters. Mean Streak is big. I will give it that.

I'd rather ride Cyclops or even Teddy Bear any day. Size isn't everything. See also Hercules. Or the later days of the old Texas Giant.

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^^^ Actually, funny story about that... I used to passionately hate Mean Streak's overbanks, but they've done some recent work on them or something. When I was at CP a few weeks ago, I actually enjoyed my ride on MS, even though it was heavily trimmed. Instead of smacking between the two rails, there were actually laterals, particularly on the second overbank. There was even some light airtime in the second half of the course! The bottoms of the hills still jackhammer pretty bad, but now I can say that I actually like more than one of CP's woodies. It was a very refreshing change.

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^^^ Actually, funny story about that... I used to passionately hate Mean Streak's overbanks, but they've done some recent work on them or something. When I was at CP a few weeks ago, I actually enjoyed my ride on MS, even though it was heavily trimmed. Instead of smacking between the two rails, there were actually laterals, particularly on the second overbank. There was even some light airtime in the second half of the course! The bottoms of the hills still jackhammer pretty bad, but now I can say that I actually like more than one of CP's woodies. It was a very refreshing change.

I noticed the same thing, I actually rode it 4 times.. in the back. It wasn't rough at all... but then again I'm use to The Beast. :P

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I was just stating what I'd heard about the reputations of most of these. Thinking again, perhaps that wasn't the best idea...I was just trying to simply say, could it be Son of Beast is just too big for a wooden coaster- even before factoring in poor construction, etc.

And, from what I have seen, Mean Streak and Rattler don't exactly get the best reviews most of the time...here's the TPI page for Mean Streak, read the comments. It's pretty "mixed", even though there are some positive reviews:

http://www.themeparkinsider.com/reviews/cedar_point/mean_streak/

Now, as I have yet to visit either SFFT or Cedar Point, I won't have a true, 100% say on how good/bad these coasters may or may not be for myself. I was merley going on what I had heard about their repuations- then again if I always followed that, I would probably hate Kings Island's own Vortex- and I do not, in fact quite the opposite.

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